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PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2005 11:28 pm
by yankeflyer
I think I should check my enthusiasm for my new plane for now and just concentrate on the engines. :rolleyes:

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 12:23 pm
by Guest
titaniumjoe.com

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 8:49 pm
by Chappy
I've never worked with Titanium. Can I cut it, turn it, and finish it with normal tooling?

Chappy

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 9:41 pm
by yankeflyer
I asked the same question - still waiting for George to answer. He did some great looking pieces

Miles

PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2005 8:18 pm
by Billm
I know a LITTLE bit about working Ti. It works with basically the same cutting tools as steel but work-hardens like stainless 303 or 304 (really badly, it gets hard FAST). You need to drill using a pretty slow RPM (about 1/4 that of steel) but use LOTS of feed pressure. When I first made a drilling unit for a portable set-up for the 737 I set a 1/4" drill at 3200 RPM and low feed and real quickly I could read a book by the glow off of the drill bit. Cutting and milling is similar.
Bill

PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2005 9:28 pm
by yankeflyer
What about weight compared to aluminium

miles

PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2005 9:30 pm
by Chappy
Thanks, Bill, for the info.

The only time I ever purchased any Titanium was when I was a kid. I had a mini-bike with a 2 stroke West Bend engine that I had ported and stuffed. It made so much more power that it keep ripping the rear sprocket bolts in two. I purchased 3 bolts - I think I had to mow 3 yards to pay for them - but they never failed. Too bad I didn't know about grade 5 bolts. It would have saved me a bunch of money.

Chappy

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 4:53 pm
by Billm
Miles

Weight (generically) for Ti is about 1.5 times that of Alum, and thus about 1/2 that of steel (for a given volume.
In the back of my mind I remember that it is about the equiv of steel for strength (per unit volume) but at 1/2 the weight is better for aircraft. I cannot remember the specifics for Ti relative to crack propagation but I think that it is something to be watchful of.

Chappy

Should have gone to grade 8, really good stuff (4340 steel)

Bill

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:09 pm
by Guest
Thanks Bill, for the update on titanium properties. It sounds like I'm overbuilding and it's not necessary to pay the weight penalty. I guess 6061 T6 aluminum is adequate.