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PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2005 8:12 pm
by Billm
I was reading a book called "Chosing your homebuilt" and they have a section on a plane called the Merlin which is (was?) built by the Malcolm Aircraft Co., first in Baldwin, Ontario (Canada) but then in 1991 moved to the US.
The Merlin uses a modified Lazair wing (last 4 feet cut off, and covered with Hipec).
Anyone ever heard of it before?
Bill

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:42 am
by Chappy
Bill,

I don't know the plane, but a quick Google search shows that although it may have a wing built in a similar way to Lazair's, it certainly isn't a Lazair wing with 4 feet cut off. At least it sure doesn't look like it to me. The shape is all wrong, and it has full span ailerons.

The Lazair wing was lifted from Ultraflight and plopped onto a couple Ultralights over the years. The Merlin doesn't appear to be one of them.

Chappy

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:17 pm
by Guest
The leading edge is built of 2024 T3 aircraft aluminum. The strong, 9" aluminum "I"- beam main spars (0.080" laminated) and wing leading edges ("D-cells") are completely pre-built by the Merlin Aircraft factory. The wing ribs are constructed by the builder, using high-density foam for light weight and strength. These easily-assembled ribs are capped with heavy-duty 0.040" aluminum "U" channels. These "U" channel rib caps are joined from top to bottom of the rib by 1" straps of aluminum. There is no structural wood in the aircraft anywhere, thus eliminating the worry of rot and the eventuality of warping. Foam has been chosen because of its durability. Fewer ribs are required due to the exceptional rigidity they provide, simplifying construction and installation. The foam ribs can be repaired, if necessary, much more easily and affordably than either wood or aluminum stamping.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 2:34 pm
by Billm
OK
It sounds like the Merlin has Lazair "inspired" wings, not Lazair wings.
From the write-up it sounds like it uses the Lazair foils and handles really well, especially at low speeds.
It was just interesting to go to the index, look-up "Lazair" and see what I found.
Bill