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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2008 9:58 pm
by yankeflyer
That set up looks great -- I will have one half-inch for clearance between the inside of the disc and the spokes of the wheel. I will probably by the first calipers set up that will meet that requirement. I have the disc, they are exactly like the ones in your picture. I'll try to post picture of the disc on the wheels soon.

Still looking for options on fuel tanks. http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/a ... lTanks.php
http://www.air-techinc.com/catlist.asp? ... exclusives

PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2008 6:41 am
by JPXman
do a search here for nalgene

or go to www.usplastics.com and search for "nalgene jerrican"

almost a spot on size match for the series II/III tank - i don't know about series I tank tho....

PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2008 8:08 am
by shorty_
I have used just a red 5 gal gas can many times.
you have to move the one bracket behind the seat.
drill 2 holes into plastic lid on cap and insert lines..

Heck you can just pull it out when low ands drop in a premix tank in its place and drop in lines adn twist cap on.
Simple and cheap !!

PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 2:00 pm
by yankeflyer
got these on ebay for 80 dollars-be here next week

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 1:11 pm
by yankeflyer
Hey Joe,

Hey not to worry -- the bolts are grade eight and approximately three quarters of an inch in diameter and the steel that makes up the bent fork, is from a bridge spike, actually two bridge spikes. I'm sure that if there's a weak spot in the set up and design it is my welding but that gets better all-time. I guesstimate that the steel will take about 100 lbs. before it starts to be bend again.

I could take one of the fork's and Weld a socket to one end and use a torque wrench to see how much weight or force it took, before it would start bending again. But I feel confident that the set up is adequate to the task.

To be sure what I've done so far, is more proof of concept rather than a finished product. However I feel good about the structural integrity of the tail wheels and the rotary skid, although I must admit, if I were to do it again I would use the six-inch tailwheel I found at one of the sport and kit airplane parts suppliers, for my rotary skid.

I still plan to come up with some sort of footrest other than just the frame and may incorporate another brace to the rotary skid from the outside frame. Also there are couple other ways to reinforce the bent fork's -- either by a webbing trust type design /with or without the web, or simply a 2 in. piece of steel, the same size, welded to the fork at the apex.

It can't go without saying, that I do appreciate the critique and your interest in my project. In the short run I just want to fly the pioneers once so I can say I did it, after that I want to repower the lazair with a couple of the powered parachute engines that I've researched -- many great options there.

For the long run I hope this plane is going to be the platform for an electric powered Lazair.

The biggest single thing I've done that will enhance the performance of this airplane is to lose 45 lbs. since I bought the plane.

Right now I`m taking off the wings so I'm take off the main wheels to add the disk brakes.

Best regards

Miles

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 7:38 pm
by yankeflyer
Your plane looks great and I'm looking forward to following your covering process. When I repower mine I plan to upgrade and accessorize as most do towards the wider gear reinforced spar for larger engine and on and on and on...

It's going to be a great plane to fly.

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 8:48 pm
by uscgairdale
"......i am going to install a pair of Spoilers similar to what Thomas has done to his Lazair Elite....."

The only thing that spoilers will do is add complexity to a Lazair without any tangible advantage. A well versed Lazair pilot can easily fly slow and spot a landing. Heck I've seen it done crossways on a grass strip that's only 50' wide (with a headwind). If you need a steep approach into a landing zone then a slip drop you down real quick too. Hmmmm, if it were a worthwhile mod then there would be more than just two or three of them out there.

If you just absolutely have to fly something with spoilers/airbrakes then I might suggest any number of products put out my Northrop Grumman or Lockheed Martin.

Just my opinion,
Dave

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 12:01 pm
by yankeflyer
Rudder pedals would be a nice upgrade to my series one, though I'm looking forward to flying the aerocoupe style controls.

Spoilers --?

One afternoon at Arlington airfield in Washington state, 1987 a lazair - in the pattern - did a 180 right in front of the crowd, gathered at the front of the FBO office by the fire pit. During the turn, the inside wing, at one point the tip appeared to fly backwards.

This is going to be a exciting plane to learn -- soon my main focus will be weight and balance and any options I might have towards moving my seat, so that I could comfortably wear a helmet.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 11:25 pm
by Chappy
uscgairdale @ Feb 17 2008, 09:48 PM wrote: "......i am going to install a pair of Spoilers similar to what Thomas has done to his Lazair Elite....."

The only thing that spoilers will do is add complexity to a Lazair without any tangible advantage. A well versed Lazair pilot can easily fly slow and spot a landing. Heck I've seen it done crossways on a grass strip that's only 50' wide (with a headwind). If you need a steep approach into a landing zone then a slip drop you down real quick too. Hmmmm, if it were a worthwhile mod then there would be more than just two or three of them out there.

If you just absolutely have to fly something with spoilers/airbrakes then I might suggest any number of products put out my Northrop Grumman or Lockheed Martin.

Just my opinion,
Dave


I totally agree with this. Spoilers add weight that will reduce the overall performance of any Lazair, while having only one function - to increase your sink rate. By learning speed control, you can learn to slow your plane down and do the same thing as spoilers. The Lazair, when properly rigged and within weight and balance, is an extremely forgiving plane to fly, and can be flown quite safely very near stall. Learning speed control and getting the feel of the plane is key. After you get some airtime in on your plane and feel very comfortable with it, start covering your airspeed indicator and discover how your Lazair will "talk" to you. Personally, I don't think I ever made really good landings until I stopped looking at my ASI.

Remember, it takes a certain amount of power to maintain cruise altitude at a given weight. Only excess power gives you climb. Adding weight w/o adding power equals less climb performance. And, unfortunately, adding weight, then adding power to compensate for the weight, will result in a structurally weaker airframe.

The best mod by far that I ever made to my early series 1 was the Ultraflight rudder pedal modification kit designed by Peter Lawrence.

Chappy

PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2008 6:56 am
by xgary
Guys, I would lke to chime in on a few posts above.

The wheel mod is nifty -- simple with platic bushings.
over kill on a ser 3 as it will likley never touch the ground but would work on ser2 fine. The 3/4 " grade 8 bollt HUGE over kill. You would NEVER break or bend that with a lazair hitting a wall at 60 mph. Furthmore AN bolts are closer to a grade 5 and you want to bend the bolt rather than using too brittle grade 8 or higher. This goes for all the lazair bolts used.

The spoilerS? Well I think like chappy said sums it up -- Explore your flying ability and hone on it to get perfection. practice SLOW FLIGHT and at stall spedd or 1 or 2 mph over it. Be able to reconize the stall by feel of the stock/airplane.

Cheers