Rotax Rebuild

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Postby Shannon » Thu Feb 23, 2006 10:10 am

Some of the earliest supplied 185s were equipped with side covers and the gear internally in place of the blank spacer.
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Postby Shannon » Thu Feb 23, 2006 10:11 am

Pic 2
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Postby Shannon » Thu Feb 23, 2006 10:16 am

I've never used any sealant on the carb to cylinder spacer-block gasket.
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Postby flyalaz » Thu Feb 23, 2006 12:49 pm

Hi Shannon,

Well, if you don't ask, you'll never find out. There are a lot of little tid-bits of info on this plane that only come out if specific questions are asked, and the way I look at it, there are no stupid questions right? Better to be safe than sorry. Now I'm going to make those cable brackets that George came up with, and continue to install the carbs.
I never did like the way my throttle cables were attached. I had visions of them coming off and flying into the prop. George's solution is a beauty. I have a spare housing I'll try drilling and tapping first before moving on to the good motors.

Cheers,
Karl
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Postby Shannon » Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:01 pm

It's a great question. I don't think anyone has asked about this on the forum before.


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Postby flyalaz » Thu Feb 23, 2006 11:27 pm

Hi Shannon,

I think you may be right. I don't remember seeing this one come up.
Now that the motors are together, it's time to put it all back on the nacelle. I've seen your test stand and it made me think about making a bench top jig to hold the nacelle, so I can have an easier time working on reassembly and changing out the choke controls. I find that when I have the entire assembly on the table, I've got to be real careful how I move it so it doesn't tip, and it's always moving around when I don't want it to. A couple of chunks of lumber and some clamps ought to do the trick nicely. Maybe make it pivot from vertical to horizontal.

Karl
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Postby Chappy » Fri Feb 24, 2006 1:42 am

Karl,

I like to add my two cents worth. The most over priced repair parts there are must surely be gaskets! I've made virtually all the gaskets I used for the last 30 years when working on everything from tractors to lawn mowers. I do purchase head and valve cover gaskets. I have quite a collection of gasket materials. Whenever I see a roll of material at a parts store that I don't already have, I pick it up. Besides saving tons of money, I save a huge amount of time by making what I need when I need it. I cannot remember ever having a failure of my homemade gaskets, which is more than I can say for a few I've purchased or that came in kits. Actually, lots of times I find I can make a better gasket by using a better material than the original was made from. Some gaskets that are offered are of just terrible quality!

A really easy way to make a gasket is to either spray a little paint on what needs a gasket, or coat it in grease (red Amsoil synthetic works great). Push the gasket material onto it, then remove and cut/punch it out. An Exacto knife does a good job. Sometimes I find a heavy old scissors works best. My wife brings me scalpels home from work now and then (she's an RN). They are super sharp, but not as strong for heavier material. A hole punch set is also a big help.

Once set up to do it, making your own gaskets is a nice way to gain some freedom from the parts man.

Chappy

PS. On the little stuff like our engines, you really need to be careful not to over tighten things, or you may crush the gaskets enough to bend/distort the flanges to the point that things will not seal - even after replacing gaskets wiith new ones. Place a straight edge on the sealing surfaces to check, especially if your having problems with a gasket not sealing properly.
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Postby flyalaz » Fri Feb 24, 2006 11:12 am

Hi Chappy,

I think everybody should add their two cents worth. Should have a topic entitled just that in every forum. Think of all stuff that would bubble out!
I remember working on some heavy farm machinery and when a gasket was needed, a sheet was laid out over the part and a ball peen hammer was used to cut the material by tapping it along the edge of the part. Saved big bucks. Mind you, that was steel not aluminum. I don't think it wise to do the same on the Rotax!Except for the cylinder head and exhaust gaskets, it cost $7.00 to do both motors. Not too bad at all, but those carb gaskets were $18.50 Cdn. each from Wildfire, and don't have the thicker material on the engine side. I guess some engineer type decided to eliminate it. This part alone would be perfect for your idea and would save a good chunk of dough. The plastic would be reuseable after cleaning, and too easy to cut around the shape with a blade.

So, now that you mentioned it, do you have any material preferences or part numbers?

Cheers,
Karl

P.S. A long time ago, I bought an overpriced torque wrench from Snap-On. Snaping off studs on my bike motors during my younger more foolish days were good lessons in what not to do.
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Postby flyalaz » Sat Feb 25, 2006 2:40 am

Hey George,

I made a bracket like yours but changed the location of the lower hole. I moved it forward .075" to be able to drill deeper and make sure it wouldn't come through inside the crankcase. I measured the spare housing I had and found that at .935" the case thickened where it necked down for the bearing hole. The top bolt hole is very close to that mark. I was able to drill almost 3/4" deep to have a really good bite on that bolt. If you do by accident go too deep, the hole will come through outside of the case and not in it.
I made a rough drawing of it I can post if you don't mind.

Karl
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Postby Shannon » Sat Feb 25, 2006 3:23 pm

"special tools" list from the original Mark 3 manual.

Shannon
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