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Postby uscgairdale » Mon Oct 24, 2005 5:51 pm

Karl,

What did you use to clean up all of your tubing? I assume that you may have used alumiprep. My two-place needs a good cleaning and my tubing looks to be in about the same shape as yours was.

Dave
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Postby flyalaz » Mon Oct 24, 2005 10:27 pm

Hi Dave,

A lot of elbow grease! :blink:
First I used varsol and a little thinner to de-gunk the stubborn grime, next, I used Scotch Brite pads, a little polishing compound, soap and water, then applied wax to protect the metal. Keeps the metal nice and clean for a long time.

Karl
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Postby flyalaz » Mon Oct 24, 2005 11:05 pm

Hey Russell,

I'm with you 100% about drilling holes. These holes, however, are already in existence for rivets, so nothing new was drilled. Although the edge material for the 3/16" dia. bolts is on the minimum side of things, I have it on good authority that this was the fix. The shear strength of the bolts are many times more than the solid rivets originally installed, and nothing short of total destruction of that front plate will let that assembly rotate again. Also in that picture, you can see some original rivets that were dumped which I later changed out.
If anyone knows about other incidents, it would be some of the older more knowledgeable guys on the site (you know who you are!), and maybe they could pipe in.

Cheers,

Karl
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Postby russell » Tue Oct 25, 2005 7:23 am

Karl,
I did not notice that the additional bolts were in the same holes as the original rivets. Going from 1/8" to 3/16" is a small increase and I could feel comfortable doing this. This is an excellent time for me to make such a mod because there are no two parts of the fuselage mated together (not even pieces that make up the nacelles). Thanks for posting the pics.

Russell
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Postby flyalaz » Tue Oct 25, 2005 2:28 pm

Hi Russell,

You're welcome. Anything to help.

Karl
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Postby uscgairdale » Tue Oct 25, 2005 4:33 pm

Thanks Karl. Thats what I have been doing except that I have been using some fine steel wool to shine things up. I guess that sometimes there is just no substitute for hard work.....bummer isn't it!

Dave
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Postby yankeflyer » Tue Oct 25, 2005 8:02 pm

There seems to be a lot of titanium of various sizes for sale on eBay. When compared with aircraft grade aluminum 6061 is there any advantage to using titanium in strength or weight savings?

Probably would cost an arm and leg to replace the main tube, but gusettes, horns, short small diameter tubing pieces; I guess I should ask if the tools I use to work aluminum will work titanium.

This is a great read for someone who hopes to reassemble an older model Lazair, this winter. Also great photographs and thanks for taking extra effort to post the pictures.
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Postby flyalaz » Tue Oct 25, 2005 8:33 pm

Yup, sure is a bummer. Mind you, some things can be accelerated. Now that my engine is apart, I just got back from sand blasting the surfaces (only exterior) with a fine grade medium, and I swear it looks 10 times better than new! It gave a very nice satin-like finish to crankcase, cylinder and head. Took me all of half an hour to do it!
Next stop, thorough washing, bearing install and then complete assembly!

Karl
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Postby lazairiii » Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:17 pm

Titanium can be a great solution for some applications.

While converting my series II kit over to the wide gear configuration during construction, I made these F-300 and F-301 brackets out of .14" Grade 6 Titanium rather than .125" 7075-T6 (factory spec material) some had said showed fatugue cracks after extended use.

I fugured that since I had to make them anyway, I just as well do it out of Titanium so I'd never have to worry about them again.

George Curtis
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Postby Chappy » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:50 pm

rayjb60 @ Oct 13 2005, 03:49 PM wrote: I found there is a definate order to assembly/disassembly that makes it possible and quite easy to do the whole process alone without help:

Here are the steps for my Series II:

Assembly:

1) Roll out Fuselage from trailer.

2) Get one wing panel and attach with 2 wing root bolts/nuts till finger tight....tip resting on ground.

3) Get other wing panel and attach 2 wing root bolts/nuts till finger tight....tip resting on ground.

4) Attach wing struts at wheel end first finger tight, then lift wing panel onto your shoulder, under the spar, and attach strut end to mid wing attach point and fully tighten both ends of strut.

5) Attach other wind strut as in step 4. Sometimes the other wing gets pushed down to the ground when your doing this side so you have to reach higher to get the strut attached to the wing.....Im 5'11" and its not a problem.

6) Attach Aileron control rods & bolt to mixer.

7) Fully tighten wing root attach bolts.

8) Attach engines to wings, including fuel tubing, throttle linkage and ground ignition wire.

9) Attach instruments.

10) Thorough preflight, fuel her up, check all controls for free motion, prime engines.

Disassembly is the exact opposite.

NO supports, benches or any accessories required or wanted as they ussualy tip over and become a nusisance !!!



Ray


Ray,

This is basically the way I do it, although I attach the wing struts at the wing first, then while lifting the wing at the spar web with my shoulder, I pull back on the lift strut between my legs (this helps take weight off my shoulder) and lift it into the carry thru fitting. I find it easier and safer to assemble my plane without help from others

I've done this probably 100 times on my very early series I. There is no torque on the fittings, so I don't see how they, or the front center fitting, can get damaged by doing this on my plane. The big difference is that my wingtips do not rest on the ground, as I have small fibreglass bows that protect the bottom of each wing (tip). They keep the wing tips high enough that the attach fittings can't hit anything. Also, the wing fittings are trimmed and rounded just a little for additional clearance. Always belt and suspenders, whenever possible.

Oh, one other difference. I will not talk with spectators during the assembly process. I just inform then that they can ask any questions when I'm done and preflighted. It's just too easy to get distracted and miss something otherwise!

Chappy
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